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Are Women Being Bullied Into Having Babies?

Posted in Personal Health 25 Aug, 2015

When to have a baby, if at all, is the big question for women. All women worry about whether it's the right time, whether it's the wrong time, whether it's the optimum time, or whether they should bother at all.

Your doctor may push you to get a bun in the oven sooner rather than later, but don't worry because I know the correct answer - move over Kirsty Allsopp and take a gobstopper. Are you ready?

There is no right or wrong time. Whatever you do will be right. It will also be wrong.

So just do your best with the feelings and info you have available. Keep a log so you can prove your thinking in court. That's what they do in the professional world. You can also use your log to calm nerves when baby does an eye-watering hell-inspired poo in the cot at 3.20am, exactly an hour after you changed the last nappy.

Why Do It Young?

  • It's easier to fall pregnant.
  • You'll have more energy.
  • You won't feel the pressure of your biological clock.
  • It may help conditions like endometriosis.

Why Do it Later?

  • You have more money and sense (possibly).
  • You have achieved some ambitions that would be hard with kids in tow.
  • You only just met the right person to be a parent with.

Why Is There Such A Debate, Anyway?

It's no-one's business but your own when you choose to have a child, so this debate shouldn't even exist. Medical professionals are there to help you make the right choice and console you if it turns out to be the wrong one. They are not supposed to judge your life choices.

If you find your nurse or GP is bullying you to get pregnant by your current beau, then step away with fingers in ears and find a new health provider.

Does The NHS Want To Save Money On IVF?

It's possibly true that fertility fades with age, but a recent study found that 78% of women aged 35 to 40 conceived within a year, compared with 84% of 20 to 34 year-olds. So a drop of 6% - that's hardly a cliff edge, is it?

Besides, what the NHS saves on IVF costs they may need to spend in antidepressants to get those younger women through the rest of their lives. Add antihistamine costs to unblock the sinuses they've cried solid and they're back where they started.

More and more women are leaving it later to fall pregnant. Thanks to the dawn of feminism, equal rights, and the pill, our fertility landscape has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Marriage and pregnancy at the age of 18 is not standard now, but with this emancipation does come a slight fertility gamble. It seems our doctors are noticing this trend and are pressuring women into reproducing earlier. Don't let them!

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